Potential South End Mitigation Site

Neighborhood & Community Services (NCS) at the City of Tacoma is currently engaged in discussions with the Tacoma Public Utility (TPU) Board about the use of one of TPU’s properties for a temporary homelessness mitigation site, located at 82nd and Pacific Avenue.

NCS gave a presentation about this issue to the TPU Board this week, and can be found here.

We in the South End are advocates for services that can help in addressing the homeless crisis. We understand the concerns that surround houseless sites in our neighborhoods, and hope you will join us in advocating for better support systems that can help alleviate the need for shelters in the first place.

SENCo Monthly General Meeting via Zoom August 2 @ 7pm

Greetings Sunny South Enders!

Join us for our upcoming SENCo General Meeting via Zoom August 2@ 7pm! Our Guest Speaker this month, Wendy Morris from LCS Northwest will share important information about dementia services, & as always, our many Liaisons Extraordinaire will be in attendance to give us news we can use & updates specific to the South End. 

Have you filled out the SNAPs survey? Join your neighbors who have already submitted theirs & help determine the priorities for the future of the South End! Find out more here, & share with your friends & neighbors! Surveys due by August 10. Next SNAPs meeting August 14, register here to join the fun!

Find a copy of the Agenda here, & Zoom link information below.

Join Zoom Meeting Online:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/7832409538?pwd=dmtBb25STXgxUVFSQmhXWDBYOFpZdz09

Meeting ID: 783 240 9538

Passcode: 236276

Join Zoom Meeting by Phone:

        1 253 215 8782 (Tacoma)

Meeting ID: 783 240 9538

Passcode: 236276

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kb9vpkgSdy

Congratulations Tony!

Join us in congratulating our SENCo Board Member Tony Caldwell for being a much deserved recipient of the 35th Annual City of Destiny Award for his lifelong work as a Disability Volunteer and advocate!

We couldn’t be more pleased to count Tony among our dedicated group of volunteers in the South End who care deeply about our neighbors and the neighborhood we share. As this year’s winner of the Lori Allison Award for Disability Advocate Volunteer, Tony has been recognized for his service on the Tacoma Area Commission on Disabilities. We celebrate and are grateful for Tony’s dedication to the community at large throughout his life, as well as during his service to our country as a Veteran of the United States Air Force where he also received the Angel Award for his work with the Red Cross.

Check out the City of Destiny Awards ceremony & find more information about the awards on the City of Tacoma website.

CONGRATULATIONS & THANK YOU, TONY!!!

SENCo Monthly General Meeting via Zoom July 6 @7pm

Hello there South Enders! We’re looking forward to our July 6 meeting and seeing you all there! Hopefully we haven’t melted in the meantime…  There will be some excellent guest speakers this month in addition to our always appreciated Liaisons Extraordinaire. Here’s our fabulous line-up this month:

  • Speaker of the House & 27th LD Representative Laurie Jinkins for a 2021 Legislative Update
  • CHB Climate Action Coordinator Emma Keese for the City of Tacoma Climate Action Planning Process @ Vision
  • LIHI Project Manager Steven Strickland for a Lincoln District Development Update

We’ll also have updates from our first SNAPs meeting, & information about the second SNAPs meeting on July 10 for anyone who would still like to join the fun! 🙂

Find a PDF of the agenda here. Zoom login info below.

Topic: SENCo General Meeting
Time: Jul 6, 2021 07:00 PM

Join Zoom Meeting Online:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/7832409538?pwd=dmtBb25STXgxUVFSQmhXWDBYOFpZdz09

Meeting ID: 783 240 9538
Passcode: 236276

Join Zoom Meeting by Phone:
1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
Meeting ID: 783 240 9538
Passcode: 236276

2021 Primary Q&A

Three Very Important Questions

We invited all 2021 primary election candidates who are especially relevant in the South End to submit answers in writing to the following three Very Important Questions:

  1. What issues do you see as being unique to the South End? How will you represent the needs of the South End in your role?

  2. What do you think would be the best approach to addressing houselessness & food insecurity here in Tacoma?

  3. What do you think is key to economic opportunity & growth for the future of Tacoma, & how would you work to develop these opportunities in your role?

See below for candidate responses. If you were unable to attend the June 7 South End Candidate Forum, please check out audio, video, and chat from the meeting.

1.  What issues do you see as being unique to the South End? How will you represent the needs of the South End in your role?

I lived in the south end neighborhood for well over a decade, throughout my twenties.  The south end has so much potential, but I feel that much of it has remained unchanged for a very long time.  The upgrades to the Lincoln District were very much needed and I would like to see that theme continued throughout the business districts in the south end.  Crime continues to be an issue as does the lack of green space for families to enjoy.  People should not have to hop in the car and drive somewhere just to enjoy the outdoors.  They should have the ability to access more parks in their own neighborhoods, not have to travel to find them.  The more they can take part in these spaces, the tighter they will feel as a community.  We all need places that we can be proud of and enjoy time with our loved ones.  As Mayor, we will be addressing the needs of the City as a whole, but I would make it clear to the families in the South End that you are on our radar.  That your time has come for some upgrades.  We will meet with the leaders of each community and listen to their wants and needs and put them into motion, so that nobody gets left behind, like the South End has for so long. -Steve Haverly, Mayoral Candidate

Though food insecurity, housing, business development, and access to arts & entertainment touch every part of the city, the South End is incredibly underserved. Though there has been a lot of growth in recent years, south Tacoma is still in need of mindful businesses, more affordable housing, and easier access to key services like banks, grocery stores, social venues, and public transportation. As mayor, it would be my goal to work with South End residents and representatives to bring businesses and services the community feels they need most. As someone who loves the South End, but does not live there, I would look to those in the area to lead the way on formulating a plan for growth and equity in the area and prioritize their input to hopefully avoid any harmful development or useless programming. -Jamika Scott, Mayoral Candidate

I think the South End is made up of a lot of microcosms just like any other part of the city.; the issues we face are not monolithic. Certain things like bettering schools and bringing back programs like the boys and girls club or new STEM camps could unify the communities more. Building accessible sidewalks and crossings will connect people to the nature and beauty in our neighborhoods and make pedestrians feel more safe. We need to fight against racism which has been allowed for too long from racist anti-Black redlining and the Asian Exclusion Acts which has lasting impacts to modern white supremacy that is tolerated by the city council. I will represent the South End by listening to every one of my neighbors and bringing back solutions that will impact us positively here. -Nolan Hibbard-Pelly, Council Dist. 4

Within the SENCo geographic area there are not many opportunities for living wage jobs.  By developing and implementing smarter policies we can increase opportunities within SENCo, as well as increasing them in adjacent areas.  Residents should be able to find employment within Tacoma that suits the needs of their desired lifestyle and I am committed to increasing those opportunities for Tacoma residents. There is currently a proposal to build a soccer stadium at Heidelberg Park.  Changing the site for this project to Lincoln Bowl is a generational opportunity at neighborhood improvement.  Renovating Lincoln Bowl would cost the same or less than a new stadium while delivering more than the requested seating capacity, create a revenue stream for the school district that could be used to maintain or expand district sports programs, lengthen the time until the school district needs another bond, create youth mentorship programs, and the 3-5,000 fans that attend the games are an instant customer base to the vacant buildings in the Lincoln Business District which is walkable from Lincoln Bowl.  Outside the box thinking like this is just one example of how I would ensure existing neighborhoods have an opportunity to receive improvement if they choose to accept it. -Brett Johnson, Council Pos. 4

Blight and public safety have been ongoing concerns along with increasing concerns of speeding throughout our neighborhoods. The South End also has an inequitable lack of green space, and that is why I supported Metro Parks 10 min walk initiative as well as the partnership with Tacoma Public Schools and the Trust for Public Lands for the Green Schools Initiative. Additionally, I’m working to ensure there is funding for the City of Tacoma and Parks to complete community based renovations at Gas Station Park and for Metro Parks to take the burden of stewardship of this park from SENCO. Jenni Reed neighbors also joined me in advocating to Rep. Fey for WSDOT to restore over 200 trees that were removed during I-5 construction. I worked along with my colleagues to successfully advocate for state funding for the Green Schools Initiative (that begins with Jenni Reed), Gas Station Park as well and funding for WSDOT to manage homeless encampments on their sites that encroach heavily on our neighborhoods. While 311 and code enforcement have much improved the City’s responsiveness over the past few years, we must hold those who dump waste accountable. I also continue to work with Public Works on traffic calming solutions and advocate for more multimodal safe pedestrian routes through the South End and all of Tacoma’s neighborhoods south of I-5. -Catherine Ushka, City Council Dist. 4

Two big issues that is are ongoing challenges in the South End is Homelessness and Public Safety, I will represent the South End by focusing on housing first solutions that will be equitably distributed throughout the city and also increase the amount of community liaison officers and reimagine what the police department looks like so that it is more responsive to the public. Joe Bushnell, City Council Dist. 5

The South End of Tacoma is underrepresented and populated with a working class that doesn’t have the time or access to proper pathways to voice their needs. I will utilize my role on the City Council to increase outreach and establish a consistent and reliable platform to gain and relay information. -Treyvon Dunbar, City Council Dist. 5

I believe issues such as crime, unemployment, poor education and hopelessness are not unique to any one area, but touch every community in some way, just as ambition, drive, hope, and a sense of community are also present in every community. I believe that a clear understanding of history, a strong educational foundation, and a knowledge of civics – how our government works – is essential to the success of every person and the community they live in. The South End will benefit from the children receiving a good education that sets them up for success.  Sarah Hendrix, School Dist. 10, Pos.2

Having grown up in Tacoma and living here all my life I have seen the various problems throughout the neighborhoods. We all need a safe neighborhood, accessible health care, both physical and mental, and the opportunity for a good living wage job. We can only do that by working together and listening. -Dick Marzano, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.2

As a Port Commissioner, I would be committed to making the Port work for EVERY resident. That means keeping our local air and water clean to preserve our health and the beauty of this area that keeps many of us living here. That also means creating pathways for any resident to pursue the family wage and well-benefitted jobs that are produced by Port operations. I am impressed by SENCo’s overall commitment to collaboration with both government offices and other local organizations. I know there are fabulous green spaces, restaurants and other resources in this part of Tacoma. However, access and walkability is not consistent throughout the community and that seems like a ripe, yet challenging area for improvement. To that end, I’d like to say congratulations on the upcoming kick-off of the South End SNAPs Focus Group. I’m looking forward to hearing more about the discussions and decisions coming out of that work; and welcome opportunities to help move that work forward. Elizabeth Pew, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.2

As the southernmost Neighborhood Council, South End resident concerns may feel unheard.  By addressing issues that increase resident satisfaction with their community, to include safe pedestrian routes and the utilization of underused spaces for communal benefit, the South End becomes more livable.  If elected Port Commissioner, my priorities are economic development through job growth and infrastructure improvements, promoting innovation and sustainable technologies, resource management through conservation and responsible utilization, and the proactive stewardship of our most precious resource, the Puget Sound.  The success of the Port will create direct and secondary employment, new business opportunities, and generate taxes, tangible benefits that will have direct fiscal impacts on improving the South End quality of life. -Mary Bacon, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.4

As an organization with an economic development mission, I believe the port must continue to grow opportunities for family wage jobs.  Two initiatives I want to see implemented are: 1.  Form a broad-based citizens advisory group to increase direct communication and improve citizen’s knowledge of Port progress and activities.  The Port is a countywide organization, and we need to strive for better communications. I’m pleased to see port staff participation in your meetings. 2.  Establishment of a Maritime and Transportation Academy in our high schools and potentially located at the Pierce Skills Center in Frederickson.  Many jobs in the tide flats do not require a four-year college degree, but still pay very well.  We need to connect employers with potential employees, and this could be a great avenue to make that happen.  This also relates to my efforts supporting workforce and work skill transfer programs.  Best example is my support for an apprenticeship program in the Port’s maintenance department.     -Don Meyer, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.4

One of the reasons I am running for Metro Parks Commissioner is because our parks need a commitment to equity. I believe the Metro Parks are going in the right direction with new projects/renovations that are planned in the area. Funding/revenue for the Parks are in a tough position place right now, but my commitment to the South End would be to prioritize projects based on the 10-minute walk standard, the Tacoma Equity index, and from the community’s input. -Blake Stagner, Parks Board Comm., Pos. 3

2.  What do you think would be the best approach to addressing houselessness & food insecurity here in Tacoma?

Coming out of the greatest pandemic of our lifetimes is going to help so much.  There are better times ahead, for everyone.  We need to stay the course and continue taking care of those who are underserved and undernourished.  The key to pulling everyone through these hard times will all depend on how quickly we can get Our City back on its feet, financially.  Most importantly, throughout this period, is to not let people fall through the cracks of the system.  We need to continually monitor the situation while we rebuild and unite our communities.  People need to feel confident that the leaders of their city are looking out for them and that no child will go hungry. -Steve Haverly, Mayoral Candidate

I think the best approach is multifaceted. We won’t be able to get everyone housed in a day, so it is imperative we make individuals and encampments safer and more sanitary by decriminalizing being houseless.There should be bathrooms, showers, garbage/recycling receptacles made available to those who are currently unhoused. Social services should also be made available on a consistent basis by meeting people where they’re at. Working simultaneously to destigmatize houselessness while also pushing for truly affordable housing through things like rent control, public assistance, transitional/stabilizing housing, and a living wage is key. I also feel a living wage will be key in eradicating food insecurity. As we work toward raising the minimum wage, it will be important for the city to also support food pantries in schools and community spaces, incentivize mutual aid work currently happening in communities, create more access to and spaces for community gardens and urban farming.  -Jamika Scott, Mayoral Candidate

The best way for the city of Tacoma to approach houselessness & food insecurity is through caring and compassion. There are many ways to help the houseless whether it is just checking in on them especially during extreme weather and bringing supplies they may need to provide housing with low barriers to access. On Hilltop they have many of these and one day while running deliveries for cold weather kits last winter I ran into a group of neighbors bringing hot meals to share. This goes a long way to fight the trauma and stigmatization that is given to our homeless people. Over the time that schools were shut down I saw them still offering meals to take home for students and I wondered what if they couldn’t make it there, didn’t have the time, or didn’t like the school provided meals, no student should be made to go hungry in our city. Every month I see the most important WIC items cleared out of the supermarket. There has to be a more efficient way to do this. As a student of the University of Washington Tacoma we have a food pantry that is small but available to all students both for pick-up and delivery. We need to do something like this rather than having private citizens or nonprofits handling it. Low income housing centers should be closest to the services we all need across the city; this will decrease the displacement we are seeing for homeless communities and actually provide for those in need. -Nolan Hibbard-Pelly, Council Dist. 4

I think the best first step is identifying the different needs within the title “houseless”.  Over recent years that broad title has grown to include a number of very specific sub-needs.  Identifying those needs, and implementing policy to help individuals based on need rather than a one size fits all approach is my favored approach. -Brett Johnson, Council Dist. 4

To address homelessness, we have to continue to increase capacity for shelter options that offer wrap-around services and not just an overnight cot. We also need to develop no or low barrier entry sites that not just get people off the streets but help provide enough stability that those who currently refuse services might consider options. None of these are perfect and we need to continually improve services, learning from our own community but also from other communities. I think that the programs the city has put together to address trash and refuse in existing camps are beginning to have a positive effect. Additionally, we need to put more work into preventing homelessness, and that is why I joined the National League of Cities Eviction Prevention Lab to develop and test ideas with 30 other cities across the nation. As we do this, we must continue to build affordable housing including permanently supportive housing and adopt land use changes that both allow greater density and protect the character and livability of our neighborhoods. The city provides funding for food banks annually as well as community garden programs both through human services funding and as a major part of the cities Environmental Action Plan. Ensuring a variety of these measures that serve diverse needs in diet and culture is essential to food security. I also think we need to incubate micro food businesses and expand on cottage food laws creating real opportunities for people to not just eat, but to discover ways to thrive. -Catherine Ushka, City Council Dist. 4

I believe in a housing first strategy to get folks off the street and into shelters, tiny homes, or hotel rooms. From there we can get folks experiencing homelessness to the services they need to battle whatever issues they are having. Food insecurity is a real problem in our community and has been exacerbated by pandemic. I’m supportive of the farm to table program and also, I think the city should be partnering with local food banks and nonprofits like Food is Free Tacoma to help get health food into the community. Joe Bushnell, City Council Dist. 5

Homelessness and food insecurity in Tacoma is an epidemic. Community members who lose housing due to any circumstances should receive housing before ever having to endure the scarring experience of living without shelter or support. The mayor of Tacoma recently signed on to a Universal Basic Income program for 500 people in the city. Expanding on the UBI program and incorporating a focus on housing first would be a beneficial approach for Tacoma needs city programs to specifically target man made food deserts to create sustainable community gardens and markets. -Treyvon Dunbar, City Council Dist. 5                                                                 

I believe that the issue of homelessness is exacerbated here in the Puget Sound area because local government does not address the overwhelming cases of drug addiction and mental illness driving people to the streets. Those who choose to live outside of the traditional home/family structures benefit from the lax enforcement and reduction of current laws. Enforcement of the law, rather than legalizing crimes and drug use, along with medical options for drug addiction and mental illness, and lifting restrictions currently imposed on churches and other community resources would help immensely in reducing homelessness.     Sarah Hendrix, School Dist. 10, Pos.2                                                                   

There is no question we like so many other cities that have a challenge feeding and housing our neighbors. As a port commissioner I will continue working hard growing living wage jobs helping people to provide for themselves. My union, longshore local 23, has been involved in helping to support and volunteer at St. Leo’s Hospitality Kitchen since it opened. Our port staff volunteers for the emergency food network and other charitable organizations as we all try to aid our neighbors. -Dick Marzano, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.2

First, stop the bleeding: provide food, water, and a safe place to rest with respect and empathy; no questions asked. Next: target wraparound services to improve health, prepare for new employment, and build other skills to bridge the gap into self-reliance for participants. The specifics of where to establish these services and what exactly they will look like will differ in each neighborhood – all those impacted need to have a voice in these decisions (that’s where the most relevant suggestions will come from as well as the most needed commitment to drive success). I would support programs that address multiple community needs together, such as participants in housing programs contributing back to the community through street clean-up, tree planting or other activities to support the safety and vibrancy of the South End.  Elizabeth Pew, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.2

I believe the best approach to addressing housing and food insecurity will be collaborative and compassionate, requiring engagement between different municipal agencies to address the challenges our residents face.  For home insecure youth, I want to make sure they have someplace safe to sleep at night and they stay in high school until they graduate.  I would support a tax credit or tax incentives for individuals or families that foster displaced young people.  For houseless adults or families, I endorse the Finnish Housing First model with its individual responsibility and personalized care.  A cooperative effort between local agencies to provide homeless residents with permanent dwellings provides a path toward rehabilitation and reintegration into the community and society. -Mary Bacon, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.4

As noted in a recent TNT article the homeless populations have many different problems with no one absolute solution.  As a former board member of a local agency (MDC), I favor “Housing First” program.  The recent report on Puyallup’s success with 20 motel rooms is a very good example.  The other part of this discussion is the need for services like additional funding for counseling.  One of the primary activities of the Tacoma Transportation Club (of which I am a member) is the contribution to the emergency food network to include food products, free trucking services and generally around $30,000 to $35,000 annual cash contributions.  Port employees and club members are also involved in re-packing.  This type and level of involvement is critical to meet the needs in our communities.  -Don Meyer, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.4

I believe something Metro Parks can assist in addressing these two issues are to expand the Community Garden program. Homelessness and food insecurity have a root issue and that is the lack of resources. We must do all that we can to provide one of the most basic human needs to the people who need it most. This won’t solve the issue of homelessness outright, but this is something the Metro Parks can do to assist other Government bodied and organizations. -Blake Stagner, Parks Board Comm., Pos. 3

Coming out of the greatest pandemic of our lifetimes is going to help so much.  There are better times ahead, for everyone.  We need to stay the course and continue taking care of those who are underserved and undernourished.  The key to pulling everyone through these hard times will all depend on how quickly we can get Our City back on its feet, financially.  Most importantly, throughout this period, is to not let people fall through the cracks of the system.  We need to continually monitor the situation while we rebuild and unite our communities.  People need to feel confident that the leaders of their city are looking out for them and that no child will go hungry. -Steve Haverly, Mayoral Candidate

I think the best approach is multifaceted. We won’t be able to get everyone housed in a day, so it is imperative we make individuals and encampments safer and more sanitary by decriminalizing being houseless.There should be bathrooms, showers, garbage/recycling receptacles made available to those who are currently unhoused. Social services should also be made available on a consistent basis by meeting people where they’re at. Working simultaneously to destigmatize houselessness while also pushing for truly affordable housing through things like rent control, public assistance, transitional/stabilizing housing, and a living wage is key. I also feel a living wage will be key in eradicating food insecurity. As we work toward raising the minimum wage, it will be important for the city to also support food pantries in schools and community spaces, incentivize mutual aid work currently happening in communities, create more access to and spaces for community gardens and urban farming. -Jamika Scott, Mayoral Candidate

3.  What do you think is key to economic opportunity & growth for the future of Tacoma, & how would you work to develop these opportunities in your role?

Tacoma is full of wildly talented people.  People who have to take their skills north to earn the compensation that their talents deserve.  Since 2014, I have been one of those people, until recently.  I left my higher paying job up north, to work in Tacoma and focus on Tacoma.  When people live in Tacoma and commute for a higher wage, they spend their hard earned money up north as well.  I feel that we need to work harder to keep these talented people in Tacoma, focusing on Our City.  We need to utilize the infrastructure that we spent so many years enhancing and draw in the technology companies that our citizens work in, to the north.  Do we want to become another Seattle?  Absolutely not.  However, we need to shake the mindset that in order to earn a decent living, we cannot work close to home.  Tacoma has it all… the talent, the infrastructure, the great neighborhoods and most of all, the people.  What needs to happen first, is Tacoma needs to realize it’s true potential and that needs to start at the top.  The leadership in this city will clear the path to a better way of thinking. -Steve Haverly, Mayoral Candidate

I believe education will be one key in fostering economic growth. Earlier and ongoing access to resources that allow Tacomans to feel empowered to do and build business in the city will lead to an even more motivated and prepared workforce. People know what they want/need for their communities, and if we can give them the tools to succeed the impact on the community at large will be invaluable. There also needs to be more focus on retaining businesses. We have so many wonderful small businesses and some of the larger ones who hit a ceiling of sorts where they feel they have to make a decision between never being quite able to thrive in Tacoma, and taking their business elsewhere with more support. I would work on developing more opportunities by figuring out what steps we need to take to ensure we’re developing Tacoma for the people who live here now. I would do this not only by studying where in our policies we can provide more protections and support for local entrepreneurs, but by also finding more ways to highlight and support the community minded development already taking place. My experience in economic development is not substantial, and that in no way makes me less committed to figuring out a path forward. I would work with those more knowledgeable to create a development plan that will allow Tacomans to have a chance to be a part of building the city they want to live in. -Jamika Scott, Mayoral Candidate

Many are moving to Tacoma right now as a gateway to Seattle but also for the unique jobs available here from industrial to healthcare work. For greater economic opportunity I would increase transit and housing options. For economic growth the city needs to invest in a green new deal public works project that could use union labor to replace current carbon emitting infrastructure as well as funding the expanding of new fields of labor for this city. -Nolan Hibbard-Pelly, Council Dist. 4

I have reviewed a number of strategic and sub-area plans in recent months and I have not seen one yet that is not a “one size fits all” approach.  In addition to the “one size fits all” approach there are no success metrics, and no alternative plans if forecasted conditions change.  We need strategic and sub-area plans that reflect the needs of our neighborhoods and have metrics for success to ensure delivery of opportunity to Tacoma residents.  Leveraging our port and attracting industries in line with our work force that provide living wage jobs are where I would start. -Brett Johnson, Council Dist. 4

Prior to the pandemic, economic trends in Tacoma were looking up including growth in bio-tech, green jobs, and information security. We are an attractive community with high performing public schools, wonderful neighbors and beautiful parks and neighborhoods that have easy access to some of the best natural attractions Washington has to offer. As such, we are well poised to land opportunities growing these industries. Tacoma was built by the working class. Developing funding and connecting Tacomans to apprenticeships and skills along the way and not just importing new workers along with new fields is and will continue to be essential. All of that said, programs like Spaceworks and the Black and Women owned business initiative must continue to have a central focus, again because we are Tacoma and we should focus on supporting the entrepreneurs among us and not just seeking economic fallout from the City to the north. -Catherine Ushka, City Council Dist. 4

We have excellent opportunities to build up green and sustainable jobs at the Port and the South Tacoma Manufacturing and Industrial Center, we also have not been capitalizing on the cybersecurity and information technology potential from JBLM. We need to incubate new and existing businesses in our area and not just try and find the next shiny business that will stay for a few years and then go. We have a lot of smart students graduating from PLU, UWT, UPS and other schools. We need to show them that they can start their own businesses here in Tacoma and don’t have to go up to Seattle or King County for work. Joe Bushnell, City Council Dist. 5

The key to economic growth in Tacoma is reallocation of tax dollars and utilizing the plethora of community organizations to create a network of well-funded, effective, and efficient community- based programs. Also, the integration of technology in low-income areas and across all government access points.             -Treyvon Dunbar, City Council Dist. 5                                                                        

A major key to economic growth and opportunity in Tacoma is ending the current governor’s “state of emergency”. Science has shown that the risk to most people is minimal and all businesses should be open at full capacity. Once that happens, eliminating government bureaucracy and lowering taxes would allow for expansion and higher wages. As a member of the Tacoma School board, I would work to ensure EVERY student has access to a foundational education that prepares them for a successful future. I would love to see cooperation with trade schools that would also increase the opportunity for success for students who are not interested in a traditional college education. Sarah Hendrix, School Dist. 10, Pos.2                                 

I believe the Port’s decision-making process must consider impacts from three viewpoints—financial, economic and environmental. All three play a key role in the long-term success of a vibrant port.  A few of my priorities are job creation, regaining container market share lost to Canada, modernizing our terminals and waterways to accommodate the ever increasing size of ships, decreasing CHG and DPM emissions from port operations/facilities, full implementation of our habitat mitigation strategy (with an emphasis on fish habitat) continue our clean air program (shore power for ships, electrification of cargo handling equipment and allowing only clean idle trucks access to our terminals), advocating for the completion of SR 167 and Canyon Road extension to allow trucks direct access in/out of the tide flats and limiting increases in property tax collections based on business need rather than assessed value of a taxpayer’s home. This list of priorities can only be achieved if we work with other stakeholders —labor unions, customers, environmental groups, local/state governments and citizens. -Dick Marzano, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.2

The key to economic opportunity and growth for Tacoma is to recognize and leverage our strengths. This is one of the reasons I am running for the office of Port Commissioner. Tacoma has over a century of experience and success with maritime and trade. In the next few decades, global industries will be changing to meet greener business standards and adjusting to shifting demographics. Throughout the US, our workforce numbers are expected to decline with the aging of our population. This is not necessarily true for our area, where I also like to say that we are “winning climate change”, because we have yet to experience many of the extreme climate events seen elsewhere. Because of this, I anticipate that we will see continued migration to our area in the next few decades. Let’s prepare for that by being first to the table with green energy innovations, investing in projects that will employ our own residents in development of more affordable housing, and prioritizing small to medium sized local businesses who will keep dollars in our region.  Elizabeth Pew, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos. 2

The key to opportunity and growth in Tacoma will be capitalizing on prospects from innovative concepts, job growth and business development in support of infrastructure improvements, resource management through conservation and responsible utilization, and making intelligent and thoughtful decisions for the benefit of Tacoma’s many constituents. If elected Port Commissioner, I will be the first practical scientist to hold a Port of Tacoma Commissioner seat and I will provide a perspective that shapes our Port’s future by offering a professional opinion based on empirical evidence and technical knowledge.   As a former labor leader, I will always advocate for workers and well-paying jobs.   Our Port’s economic and environmental development is an opportunity to promote growth in our community by increasing employment and new business opportunities. With my unique background as a scientist who has worked in both the private and public sectors for over fifteen years, my experience and insight will be an asset to our Commission.       -Mary Bacon, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.4

I believe the Port’s decision-making process must consider impacts from three viewpoints—financial, economic and environmental. All three play a key role in the long-term success of a vibrant port.  A few of my priorities are job creation, regaining container market share lost to Canada, modernizing our terminals and waterways to accommodate the ever increasing size of ships, decreasing CHG and DPM emissions from port operations/facilities, full implementation of our habitat mitigation strategy (with an emphasis on fish habitat) continue our clean air program (shore power for ships, electrification of cargo handling equipment and allowing only clean idle trucks access to our terminals), advocating for the completion of SR 167 and Canyon Road extension to allow trucks direct access in/out of the tide flats and limiting increases in property tax collections based on business need rather than assessed value of a taxpayer’s home. This list of priorities can only be achieved if we work with other stakeholders —labor unions, customers, environmental groups, local/state governments and citizens. -Don Meyer, Port of Tacoma Comm., Pos.4 

One of the key economic opportunities and growth for Tacoma’s future that Metro Parks is involved in along with the City and other organizations is the Soccer stadium for our D2 teams. The economic impact report of the new Stadium/sports complex suggest an economic output of $644 Million in the next 32 years. That’s a large sum that would benefit Tacomans through new jobs and new taxes to be collected by the City and Metro Parks. There is a delay on the constructions due to the pandemic/budget issues, but I believe we need to make this a one of the top priorities for the future of Tacoma. -Blake Stagner, Parks Board Comm., Pos. 3

                                                                                  

SENCo Monthly General Meeting via Zoom June 7 @7pm

Happy June, South Enders!

Primary season is here, folks, & we’re especially looking forward to our own South End Candidates Only forum coming up at SENCo’s monthly General Meeting on June 7 at 7pm. See Zoom info below. All candidates relevant to the South End were invited to join us for a three minute re/introduction during the June 7 meeting, as well as an invitation to respond in writing to three Very Important Questions.  You can see which candidates have RSVP’d so far here, & find candidates’ answers to the three Very Important Questions can be found over here.

We’re so excited for the upcoming South End Neighborhood Action Plans, or “SNAPs,” for SENCo kickoff meeting (over Zoom) on June 12 from 10am-11:30am! Have opinions on goals for the future of the South End & want to participate in the process to update our original SNAPs from the 1990’s? Find out more here ! Sign up here! Tell all your South End friends & neighbors!!!

Also! We’ll be voting on two open seats for new SENCo board members. Since the South End Neighborhood has a total population of almost 40,000 people & SENCo has 11 board members, every board member represents over 3600 people each… Unless you show up, because your vote counts!  Per TMC 1.45.050C, which is the Tacoma municipal code that governs neighborhood councils, “Any resident, renter, or owner of property, business, or nonprofit and their employees, who live or work within a Neighborhood Council Boundary, may participate…” in voting! Join us & be heard!

Zoom login information:

Topic: SENCo General Meeting
Time: Jun 7, 2021 07:00 PM

Join Zoom Meeting Online
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/7832409538?pwd=dmtBb25STXgxUVFSQmhXWDBYOFpZdz09

Meeting ID: 783 240 9538
Passcode: 236276

Join Zoom Meeting by Phone
1 253 215 8782 (Tacoma)
Meeting ID: 783 240 9538
Passcode: 236276

A PDF of the June agenda can be found here.

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS FOR SENCo LIAISONS EXTRAORDINAIRE, PLEASE SEND THEM BEFORE THE MEETING (OR ANYTIME, REALLY) TO: SENCO253@GMAIL

🙂 🙂 🙂

Have a guest speaker idea for a future meeting? Let us know! senco253@gmail.com 

2021 Primary Candidates

‘South End Candidates Only’ Forum June 7 @ 7pm

We invited the following candidates—who are especially relevant to the South End—to re/introduce themselves to the community during our June 7 General Meeting @ 7pm .  A “♥” indicates candidates who have already RSVP’d:

Mayor
♥  Jamika Scott
  Steve Haverly
♥  Victoria Woodards
At Large City Council Pos 6
♥  Brett Johnson
Kiara Daniels
Council District 4
♥  Catherine Ushka
Nolan Hibbard-Pelly
Israel James McKinney
Council District 5
♥  Joe Bushnell
♥  Treyvon Dunbar
Anne Artman
Civil Service Position 1
Femi Adeleke
Eric Hansen
Leeanna Lara
Civil Service Position 2
Dan Sexton
School Dist. 10 Director Position 2
Enrique Leon
Sarah Hendrix
School Dist. 10 Director Position 4
Chelsea McElroy
Port of Tacoma Commissioner Position 1
Laura Gilbert
♥  John McCarthy
Port of Tacoma Commissioner Position 2
♥  Dick Marzano
♥  Elizabeth Pew
Jeanette Twitty
Port of Tacoma Commissioner Position 4
♥  Don Meyer
Christopher Pierce
Brian Duthie
Nirav Sheth
Scott Lewis
c bey el
♥  Mary M. Bacon
Parks Board Commissioner Position 3
♥  Blake Stagner
Pierce Co. Superior Court Superior #23
Andre Penalver

We also asked candidates to submit answers in writing to three Very Important Questions. You can find their answers here.

SNAPS!

Calling all South Enders!

South End community members needed for participation in South End Strategic Neighborhood Action Plans (SNAPs) focus group!

Your South End Neighborhood Council has been working with your Council Members, Safe Streets, and UWT on a process to update the South End Neighborhood Action Plans (SNAPs). If you did not know we had one either, this could be because the previous version is more than 20 years old!

We are now inviting community members from across the South End to participate in a focus group that will help inform the goals of the new and improved SNAPs. All are welcome, and in keeping with the South End Neighborhood Council’s commitment to promote an equitable and anti-racist community, Black and Indigenous community members, people of color, LGBTQ individuals, individuals with disabilities, youth, seniors, immigrants, and refugees are especially encouraged to apply.

Meeting Date & Time: June 12, 2021 from 10am-11:30am

Register Here

A zoom link will be sent out to all registered participants.

SNAPs focus group participants will be asked to commit to meeting once a month from June to September. Community members who participate in these focus groups will be compensated with a small stipend in appreciation for your time.

If you are interested in participating, or have further questions, please contact Darren Pen: dpen@safest.org

Want to Join SENCo?

South Enders! 

Always wanted to join the SENCo board? Here is your chance!

We have 2 open seats up for election at our next meeting over Zoom on June 7 at 7pm.

Applications are due by Friday, May 29. 

How to apply:

Visit the Get Involved tab on our website & download an application.

Email completed application to senco253@gmail.com 

-or-

Send hard copy to:

SENCo Elections

4911 S Alaska 

Tacoma, WA 98408

We’re excited to hear from you! 

Questions? Let us know! senco253@gmail.com